Volume 21, Issue 5 (2019)                   JAST 2019, 21(5): 1161-1172 | Back to browse issues page

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1- Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
2- Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Islamic Republic of Iran. , khomeiri@gau.ac.ir
3- Stem Cell Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
4- Cancer Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
Abstract:   (3298 Views)
In the present research work, the potential probiotic properties of Lactococcus lactis KMCM3 and Lactobacillus helveticus KMCH1 isolated from raw camel milk and traditional fermented camel milk (Chal), respectively, were studied. The probiotic properties of isolates that were investigated included the hemolysis, antibiotic resistance, antibacterial features, resistance to low pH and bile salts, survival under simulated GastroIntestinal Tract (GIT) conditions, adhesion ability to hydrocarbon, and their auto-aggregation and co-aggregation rates. None of isolates exhibited hemolytic activity. They were susceptible against tetracycline, penicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin and vancomycin. Lac. lactis KMCM3 and L. helveticus KMCH1 retained their viability at pH 3.0 (8.68 and 8.6 log cfu mL-1, respectively), 0.3% w/v bile salts (8.23 and 8.58 log cfu mL-1, respectively) and under simulated GIT conditions (8.31 and 8.46 log cfu mL-1, respectively). Both of these isolates inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, B. cereus and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium with MIC values of 6.25 to 25 mg mL-1. In addition, They exhibited an ability to adhere to hydrocarbon (xylene), and possessed a high auto-aggregation and co-aggregation rate (more than 40%).
 
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Article Type: Original Research | Subject: Food Microbiology
Received: 2018/04/3 | Accepted: 2018/09/15 | Published: 2019/09/15

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